Tag: poetic wisdom

V&E Poetic Therapy: Mirror

by Sylvia Plath I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions. Whatever I see I swallow immediately Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike. I am not cruel, only truthful, The eye of a little god, four-cornered. Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall. It is pink, with speckles.

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Oak Passage Full Moon Lunar Yoga & Guided Meditation in London Ontario

The full moon represents a balance of solar and lunar energy: the moon reflects the sun bringing day to night. A full moon ceremony is your opportunity to align the dark and light within you.
We use the oak as a gateway, a place of passage between our world and the Otherworld. We dedicate our work to aligning ourselves in prepararion for the responsibilities of success and material gain. We have come to accept that we DESERVE abundance and now we must align our intention for what we will DO with abundance.
Our lunar yoga practice this month is inspired by the Oak lessons of strength and endurance.

Tea Wisdom

“One thorn of experience is worth a whole wilderness of warning.” James Russell Lowell “There is pleasure in the pathless woods.” Lord Byron “One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.” William Shakespeare “Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.” Lao Tzu    

Poetic Therapy: Her Kind

Her Kind By Anne Sexton I have gone out, a possessed witch, haunting the black air, braver at night; dreaming evil, I have done my hitch over the plain houses, light by light: lonely thing, twelve-fingered, out of mind. A woman like that is not a woman, quite. I have been her kind. I have

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V&E Poetic Therapy: Cradle Song

A short reflection based on the reading of the poem Cradle Song written by Alfred Lord Tennyson:
why, in our youth are we so eager to leave our mothers, to leave the nest, to grow? With exceptions, most of the dangers in life are beyond the safety of our homes and yet we seem to have this drive to run toward them as fast as we can. Then as adults it seems reverse our drives and we become afraid of the change that the world brings. Sometimes we are so afraid to leave the nest, we are caught by it, trapped there and stagnant. What is the happy middle ground? Do you know your nest? Are you able to leave?

V&E Poetic Therapy: Altarwise by Owl-light

Altarwise by Owl-Light is a poem rich with feeling, symbolism and spirituality. Thought to be one of the more surreal and challenging works from Dylan Thomas’ collection of poetry because of the heavy reference to complex philosophical notions of time and space and the deeply religious symbolism. I felt the potency of this poem from the first line and find the imagery incredibly inspiring and engaging. I don’t think the sentiment of the poem is challenging because there are so many lines that are really yummy to read just in the way the sound and rhythm of the words come together.
I found the experience of reading the poem and writing this article invigorating and healing for me. I felt like my mind had been stagnating and this was just what I needed to revive me! In addition to sharing the poem I have briefly defined some of the terms to enrich the reading:
Furies, Abaddon, Mandrake, Capricorn, Cancer, Pelican of circles, Adam, Jacob, Nettle roots, Hemlock, Tree- tailed worm, Eve, Skullfoot, Rip Van Winkle, and Antipodes, what do they have in common, and what is their significance? I hope you enjoy and I would love to hear your feedback!

The Ancient Wisdoms

The Ancient Wisdoms,
Old Welsh Prose from 21 Lessons of Merlyn: a study of Druid Magic & Lore by Douglas Monro. The ancient wisdom refers to the wisdom of the Ancient Druids and bardic tradition in Wales. The mythology of the Welsh Druids is often associated with the name of Taliesin, Merlyn, or Merlin, the wizard-like figure that J.R.R. Tolkien uses as a model for characters like Gandolph the Grey in Lord of the Rings. The ‘Wizards’ or Druids were actually the poets, philosophers, scientists, seekers and all- round wise men of their time. They have associations with other ancient sects such as the Pythagoreans and both were famous for keeping no records of knowledge.

Everything they learned was committed to memory, much of it was encoded and passed on verbally in song or poetry to preserve the sanctity of the words.
The Pythagoreans believed that number was sacred, for the Druids, it was the letter.

Consequently, they developed an intricate relationship with the alphabet. Each letter would have a plethora of associations and when each of those meanings combined in the word, it had tremendous power.

V&E Poetic Therapy: Drowning

Drowning is not so pitiful As the attempt to rise. Three times, ‘t is said, a sinking man Comes up to face the skies, And then declines forever To that abhorred abode Where hope and he part company,— For he is grasped of God. The Maker’s cordial visage, However good to see, Is shunned, we

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