The Ancient Wisdoms

The Ancient Wisdoms,
Old Welsh Prose from 21 Lessons of Merlyn: a study of Druid Magic & Lore by Douglas Monro. The ancient wisdom refers to the wisdom of the Ancient Druids and bardic tradition in Wales. The mythology of the Welsh Druids is often associated with the name of Taliesin, Merlyn, or Merlin, the wizard-like figure that J.R.R. Tolkien uses as a model for characters like Gandolph the Grey in Lord of the Rings. The ‘Wizards’ or Druids were actually the poets, philosophers, scientists, seekers and all- round wise men of their time. They have associations with other ancient sects such as the Pythagoreans and both were famous for keeping no records of knowledge.

Everything they learned was committed to memory, much of it was encoded and passed on verbally in song or poetry to preserve the sanctity of the words.
The Pythagoreans believed that number was sacred, for the Druids, it was the letter.

Consequently, they developed an intricate relationship with the alphabet. Each letter would have a plethora of associations and when each of those meanings combined in the word, it had tremendous power.

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V&E Philosophy of Wellness

Many of us take a top down approach to our wellness thinking that if we change the way we eat, if we work out, buy ethical products then we are achieving wellness. Yet there is still an upsetting amount of judgement and shame that we put on ourselves and others and the initiative fails. Why is this? Changing your perspective might truly be the first step.

V&E Poetic Therapy: One Art

One Art

BY ELIZABETH BISHOP

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master…

The Second Coming

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
by William Butler Yeats 1919
I’m curious, how does this poem make you feel?

Is this simply a response to the traumatic WWI, and if so, why is our response to trauma to end it all? To believe that it is all ending?