V&E Poetic Therapy: Cradle Song

A short reflection based on the reading of the poem Cradle Song written by Alfred Lord Tennyson:
why, in our youth are we so eager to leave our mothers, to leave the nest, to grow? With exceptions, most of the dangers in life are beyond the safety of our homes and yet we seem to have this drive to run toward them as fast as we can. Then as adults it seems reverse our drives and we become afraid of the change that the world brings. Sometimes we are so afraid to leave the nest, we are caught by it, trapped there and stagnant. What is the happy middle ground? Do you know your nest? Are you able to leave?

The Ancient Wisdoms

The Ancient Wisdoms,
Old Welsh Prose from 21 Lessons of Merlyn: a study of Druid Magic & Lore by Douglas Monro. The ancient wisdom refers to the wisdom of the Ancient Druids and bardic tradition in Wales. The mythology of the Welsh Druids is often associated with the name of Taliesin, Merlyn, or Merlin, the wizard-like figure that J.R.R. Tolkien uses as a model for characters like Gandolph the Grey in Lord of the Rings. The ‘Wizards’ or Druids were actually the poets, philosophers, scientists, seekers and all- round wise men of their time. They have associations with other ancient sects such as the Pythagoreans and both were famous for keeping no records of knowledge.

Everything they learned was committed to memory, much of it was encoded and passed on verbally in song or poetry to preserve the sanctity of the words.
The Pythagoreans believed that number was sacred, for the Druids, it was the letter.

Consequently, they developed an intricate relationship with the alphabet. Each letter would have a plethora of associations and when each of those meanings combined in the word, it had tremendous power.

on Good and Evil

An argument aginst basic notions of morality.

To forgive yourself and others is to embrace the ambiguity of empathy and compassion. Nothing is ever simple when it comes to what is good and what is evil, often it comes down to what side you are on and your perspective.

From Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet

“Of the good in you I can speak, but not of the evil.
For what is evil but good tortured by its own hunger and thirst?
Verily when good is hungry it seeks food even in dark caves, and when it thirsts it drinks even of dead waters.”